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Eugene Man Convicted of Child Sex Abuse

EUGENE, Ore. — A Eugene man will spend 15 years in prison for encouraging child sex abuse.

A judge also fined Catalin Dulfu $5,000. That money will go into a fund for one of his victims.

A jury convicted 54-year-old Dulfu two weeks ago after about three hours of deliberation.

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  1. Nicole says:

    Hmm even for encouraging he needs to be shot or something. These are poor innocent kids! And only $5000 for his victims?? I’m sorry but if one of those was my kids I would demand ALOT more then that. He and tat lady are a disgrace to this world.

    1. Corinna says:

      Dear Ms. Nicole: I am wondering why you think it is alright for you to post such offensive comments which incite and encourage violence against others? People in this country are not “shot” for their crimes; they are convicted and sent to prison to serve time and hopefully be rehabilitated as well as make restitution.The $5,000 restitution in this case was paid to a fund set up for one victim, who, by the way, was originally victimized by the person who abused her and posted videos of that abuse on the internet. Now, she has a lawyer who goes around the country collecting money anytime her video appears on someone’s computer, whether accidentally or on purpose. Just because her video was found on Mr. Dulfu’s computer does not mean he actually viewed the image, although he was ordered to pay $5,000 restitution. Restitution is just that, designed to compensate the person harmed for their injury or loss. However, once thousands of offenders have seen a set of images, one additional person possessing the images makes little difference to the victim and is much less harmful than the initial posting of an image to the internet. For example, if the child, who is now an adult, is not aware that someone saw her image, that person’s viewing of the image is not a proximate cause to any trauma she experiences. Instead, the trauma (other than that of the underlying sexual abuse itself) primarily comes from the fact the victim has no way of knowing which (if any) people she passes on the street may have viewed the images of her past abuse. Her fear is grounded in the knowledge that ‘the images are forever in cyberspace, able to resurface at any time.’” That fear exists in perpetuity, regardless of whether anyone new ever views her image. The harm begins as soon as those images get onto the Internet (and likely again when law enforcement itself actually notifies the victims their images have been found on someone’s computer) — these associated fears can never be put totally to rest. For that reason, society can acknowledge that a special harm is created by the first person who sends a set of images out into the ether of the Internet . . . Furthermore, when detectives do identify child victims, they exhaustively search e-mail accounts, chat logs, and so forth in an effort to track any flow of those files. In many circumstances, detectives can identify how the evidence got onto the Internet and then positively identify the offender who initially released images to the Internet. The injuries to the victim in this case were not the direct result of the harm caused by someone who MAY have viewed her image down the road. Once something is uploaded to the Internet, it is almost impossible to remove, unless the person who posted the offensive comment or image removes it themselves. Which is what I think you should do with your hateful comments as you clearly do not understand this case and what occurred and your comments are designed to incite violence against another person. Moreover, what do you mean by your further comment “He and tat lady are a disgrace to this world.” Who is “tat lady?” You might try reviewing your comments for accuracy before finalizing your future posts.

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