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Possible to Get Flu Even with Vaccine

(CNN) — The Centers for Disease Control is warning the flu season appears to be bad this year, spreading faster and earlier than usual.

The CDC says the South and Southeast section of the country is getting hit hard. Even people who received the flu shot can still get sick.

“Number one, it does take some time for the vaccine to take effect and if you are exposed to influenza a very short time after getting the vaccine, you can still get infected. Number two, there’s a lot of influenza viruses out there. The influenza vaccine will protect against three of those viruses,” said Dr. Michael Jhung, Medical Officer in the Influenza Division CDC.

There is one theory that the outbreak may be due, in part, to the possibility that the flu vaccine does not include the strain that is currently spreading across the country, but the CDC disagrees, saying the influenza virus people are being infected with appears to be covered by this year’s vaccine.

2 comments

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  1. Postone says:

    The truth is, getting the flu shot doesn’t mean you won’t get the flu, even if it’s two weeks. Two weeks is typically the time it takes after getting the flu shot for it to be fully effective. But even then you can still get the flu. The flu shot may keep you from getting the strain (if they guess the strain right? Scientists give it an educated guess as to what strain to make the flu shot for) for any given season. They don’t always get it right, and they won’t know until around mid April or so) if they guessed right.The flu shot may also ease your symptoms if you get the flu, or it may not!

    Getting the flu shot is NO guarantee you won’t get the flu!

    There are many factors in getting the flu. Young children who’s immune system is “still growing” or getting stronger are more susceptible, because their immune systems are not peak yet. Children are a veritable disease carriers, this is how their immune system builds immunities and become stronger! People who are at their peak, typically people 25 to 45 years if other wise healthy are least likely to get the flu and usually recover more quickly because there immune system is strongest. And finally people over the age of 50 have a declining immune system, which makes it more likely they get the flu and suffer longer. Of course there is an exception to every rule, nothing is set in stone.

    The are some important things you can to do to keep from contracting the flu. Washing your hands regularly, don’t touch door knobs and like surfaces and then touching your face because this is most likely way of getting a virus, any virus! It can enter the body through your eyes, nose, and mouth. People touch their faces roughly once every (20 times an hour, or 320 times per three minutes and some more, give or take. (day, that’s figuring someone is up 16 hours a day) And finally don’t hang around people with the flu.

    So I while I would most definitely get a flu shot if I could, (especially anyone over 50) its not a cure all. Like I said above there are many factors in getting the flu and then dealing with it if you do get it. The best way to fight the flu if you get it is bed rest, or taking it easy, drinking lots of fluids, eating lightly, soda crackers, soup, etc… Fluids meaning water or juice not soda, coffee or energy drinks!

    And in the end, finding a friend who can come over (although that would be a great friend exposing themselves to the flu) and keep you company, going to the pharmacy for you, or just watching a good movie with you, etc…

    And finally don’t listen to the media hype about the flu or related viruses. Go to the CDC web site to get correct and up to date information or speak to your doctor! And for goodness sakes, don’t bring it to the office if you can help it…

  2. Postone says:

    Sorry forgot to proof read: Here is a correction to the above.

    People touch their faces roughly once every (20 times an hour, or 320 times per day, that’s figuring someone is up 16 hours a day) three minutes and some more, give or take.

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