Experts say risk of getting blood clots from Johnson & Johnson vaccine vs. coronavirus is low

So far there are only six reported cases of blood clots from the vaccine that has also resulted in one death.

Posted: Apr 15, 2021 10:44 PM
Updated: Apr 16, 2021 12:15 AM

EUGENE, Ore.-- The Johnson and Johnson vaccine distribution is still on pause after reports of serious blood clots, but experts said people are more likely to get blood clots from the coronavirus itself.

The Centers for Disease Control said 3 in 10 COVID-19 patients get a serious form of blood clots. That's compared to 1 in 1 million people possibly getting a blood clot from the Johnson and Johnson vaccine.

So far, there are only six reported cases of blood clots from the vaccine that has also resulted in one death. Dr. Panagis Galiatsatos from John Hopkins University said he understands the shock factor of hearing about these cases.

"It's always hard as human beings to conceptualize when we hear a case, oh that sounds horrible like your heart goes out but recognize that case is very low," Dr. Galiatsatos said.

He said the public should look at the risk of getting blood clots in other situations not just by getting vaccinated. For instance, millions of people fly every year even though there is a risk of dying in an airplane crash. 

A panel at the Food and Drug Administration is still reviewing the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and there is no timeline on when it can start being administered again at vaccine sites across the country. 

Stay with KEZI 9 News for updates. 

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